Friday, 19 September 2014

The Winner's Curse by Marie Rutkoski


Book Summary : Winning what you want may cost you everything you love.

As a general’s daughter in a vast empire that revels in war and enslaves those it conquers, seventeen-year-old Kestrel has two choices: she can join the military or get married. But Kestrel has other intentions. One day, she is startled to find a kindred spirit in a young slave up for auction.

Arin’s eyes seem to defy everything and everyone. Following her instinct, Kestrel buys him—with unexpected consequences. It’s not long before she has to hide her growing love for Arin. But he, too, has a secret, and Kestrel quickly learns that the price she paid for a fellow human is much higher than she ever could have imagined.

Set in a richly imagined new world, The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski is a story of deadly games where everything is at stake, and the gamble is whether you will keep your head or lose your heart.

My Rating : 5 of 5 stars

My Thoughts : It was probably the most beautifully written book I've read in this year. Lyrical. Poetic. A sweeping, original story set in a high fantasy world inspired by Greco-Roman world, and without any unnecessary interference of magic.

Kestrel, the only daughter of Valorian general, impulsively buys a slave up for auction, and pays an intrinsic value. But Arin has his own plans. Kestrel soon learns that the price she paid for a slave is much steeper than she ever could have imagined.

Arin was defying for a slave. He didn't even behave like one, and his proximity to Kestrel could be unbelievable and bothersome to many, but it was something impressing as well. He was devoted to his cause, but without hurting Kestrel, adding so much depth and understanding to his character. His strength wasn't only physical, but in his determination to persevere for his enslaved country and for his love as well. Arin’s character was meant to be bold, blatant by how he spoke, but at the same time, it wasn't hard for me to see what Kestrel saw in him.

And for Kestrel, her character development was fantastic. I was impressed to see how selfish, and flawed she were, yet how selflessly she made decisions when time came. She was strong, but the strength wasn't necessarily physical. It was her intelligence. And this is the type of heroine that is much more interesting to read than sword-wielding ones.

I immediately was rooting for Kestrel and Arin as a couple. Their relationship wasn't your typical romance, it was a slow-burning complex love that thrived on power play, both manipulation and trust. I didn't found then swooning over each other, but I certainly felt a strange passion igniting between them, a bond that gradually grew stronger with each encounter.

The world building was artfully captured in words--the Valorian culture, the banquets and balls, the society that lived on gossip, where fascinating costumes were complemented with jeweled daggers.

For fans who like romance as a sub-plot in a fantasy-lite, this is you your perfect read. It will squeeze you heart and poke your lungs with intimate pleasure of reading until you will feel the desperate need for air.





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